Our Sunday Best: Who Is Driving This Story, Anyway? POV in Writing

 
 
 
C.W.A.Scott Binoculars

 
 
 
 
I crave books I love the way I crave certain foods.   I will stop cold in the middle of a task during the day with a single line from a novel or poem written in fire over my head, and the craving is so strong that I know, before the day is out, I will have that book tucked open in my right hand as neatly, and as tightly as a well-made bed.

The moment that drives my ordinary reader’s desire into the swerve of a bibliophilic craving is the artistry of the writing itself. (There are stories, and there are stories, after all.) What keeps me turning pages is my fascination with the person (or persons) whose story is being told.

But who is telling the story?

I’m not talking about the writer/author, per se.

(We know s/he is telling the story— sometimes s/he tells us right in the middle of the story— disruptively— but we’ll get into the fiddly bits of postmodern literature in just a bit.)
 
 
 

What I’m trying to ask you here is who is the actual voice telling you the story?

POV, or point-of-view, is one of the most necessary structural details you need to consider as you prepare to write your own stories.

Because, for every story, there are a thousand, thousand ways to use POV as one of the pistons pulling the action and motivation and meaning along.

There are no shortcuts to figuring out the POV question to help you sort out the structural details of your story.   

What should be helpful is to know what your options are in the POV world.   (Some structural details of a novel …. Read on, Reader!

  • More

    And then you wake (Reprise)
    Monkey Says Relax
    [Super-Secret Friday Night 5-Minute Dance Party]  Ход конем
    Instant Bluebird:  Frank Herbert's Dune
    [5-Minute Dance Party] Libertango
    [5-Minute Dance Party] Let There Be Rock  (with Pastor Bon Scott!)